Today’s Forecasting Tools and Products

ADDS map showing surface wind speed and streamlinesNational Weather Service meteorologists use images from satellites circling the globe, numerical model data from NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Prediction, real-time weather data from Doppler radar and Automated Surface Observation System (ASOS) units at America’s airports to generate aviation weather products. ASOS provides minute-by-minute updates on vital weather information, including cloud heights, wind speed, and precipitation. That information is available to forecasters around the clock.

The National Weather Service has developed several other tools to improve forecasting and communication about aviation weather.

The Collaborative Convective Forecast Product

The Collaborative Convective Forecast Product (CCFP) uses collaboration software that allows meteorologists from the AWC, the CWSUs, Canada, and the airlines to discuss thunderstorm forecasts in an Internet chat room, providing outlooks every two hours. The purpose of the CCFP is to help air traffic managers reduce weather-related flight delays and cancellations and improve airline fuel efficiency.

The Aviation Digital Data Service

“The Aviation Digital Data Service, combined with modern-day computer technology and the Internet, allows us to provide information at a glance to the people who need it most at the time they need it most,” said AWC Director Jack May. “At one Internet location, decision makers have immediate access to information that describes what is happening and what is about to happen.”.

Graphic Forecast Products

The Aviation Digital Data Service (ADDS) became NOAA’s comprehensive, user-friendly Internet aviation weather resource in September 2003. ADDS, which was developed as part of the Aviation Weather Research Program, was called by Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association Pilot Magazine “perhaps the prime source of preflight weather information for most computer-savvy pilots.”.

National Weather Service meteorologists use images from satellites circling the globe, numerical model data from NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Prediction, real-time weather data from Doppler radar and Automated Surface Observation System (ASOS) units at America’s airports to generate aviation weather products. ASOS provides minute-by-minute updates on vital weather information, including cloud heights, wind speed, and precipitation. Graphical forecast products are becoming a primary source of information for most users of aviation weather forecasts.

Graphical forecast products are becoming a primary source of information for most users of aviation weather forecasts. These products represent significant steps in providing aviation forecast information in formats that are easier to apply and interpret than traditional text products.

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